Connecting to nature through gardens

The image below is of a garden created by Steven Wells. This garden is in the Royal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre in Melbourne, VIC. The beautiful, natural space created by Steven is an environment where patients can heal their body and their soul. To read more about this inspiring project, please click here.

Royal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre                   Victoria

(Image retrieved from http://www.cultivatensw.org.au)

Children’s learning environments should reflect places where their minds and soul can be nurtured. Inspiring spaces to grow. An environment that reflects their sense of agency, curiosity and autonomy. Places they can learn. In a real context and environment. What do we really want to teach our children? Did we ever learn about the beauty of the world through books, or did we walk, with our bare feet in the grass and mud, and smell the flowers in the garden. Or the freshly cut grass of the field just before running on with our friends. Sensory experiences create rich memories that we have for the rest of our lives. What greater gift can we give than to create the most beautiful memories for our children, in a way that also teaches them about their natural environment and place in the world. Sensory, natural experiences don’t have to be hard. Take a magnifying glass to a patch of green grass..

One of my favourite memories as a child is of watching the grassy space under the trampoline. So many little creatures of the world going about their lives. So much to be found. We just need to learn to look and see.

Horticulture therapy is about nurturing your body, mind, and spirit through gardening. The peak body for this in NSW is called ‘Cultivate NSW’. For more information and direct links to the site, please click here.

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Develop your talents

Develop your talents. Too many people spend more time focusing on their weaknesses than developing their strengths“.

– Robin Sharma from ‘Life lessons from the monk who sold his ferrari’ (p.94).

Developing individual talents and supporting strengths can also be implemented in an early childhood context. Providing opportunities for children to learn using their interests and strengths as guides will support meaningful learning and understanding and foster a sense of value, identity and belonging.

– Jodie